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B.S./B.A. in Health & Human Performance: Curriculum

Curriculum Details

180 total credits required

The online Bachelor’s in Health & Human Performance program studies physical activity and well-being. The four-year program requires core courses including lower- and upper-division classes covering basics of anatomy and physiology, physical activity, exercise and behavior training. You’ll have the option to tailor your learning with three concentration options: physical education and sport, exercise science, or community health.

Online students have opportunities for internships, community partnerships and capstone experiences by working one-on-one with faculty members to find local placement. Earn your B.A. with a foreign language requirement or your B.S. with just 12 more science credits.

Transfer Information

EOU offers a generous transfer policy for course credits to make it even more affordable and accessible to learn. The online Bachelor’s in Health & Human Performance program allows up to 135 credits from previous college coursework to be transferred into EOU. All EOU majors require a minimum of 20 EOU credits.

Required Courses

Introduction to the principles of human anatomy and physiology (first of a three course sequence). This course covers anatomical terminology; overview of the chemical, cellular, and tissue levels of organization; nervous and skeletal systems. The cat is used as an anatomical model and the student and other organisms are used for the physiological portion in the laboratory segment of this course. Prerequisite: MATH 070, high school biology or chemistry is highly recommended.
Principles of human anatomy and physiology II (second course in a three course sequence). This course covers the anatomy and physiology of the blood, muscle, respiratory, and digestive systems; and metabolism. The cat is used as an anatomical model and the student and other organisms are used for the physiological portion in the laboratory segment of this course. Prerequisite: BIOL 231
Principles of human anatomy and physiology III. This course covers the anatomy and physiology of the cardiovascular, endocrine, urinary, reproductive, and sensory systems. The cat is used as an anatomical model and the student and other organisms are used for the physiological portion in the laboratory segment of this course. Prerequisite: BIOL 232.
Overview of career opportunities and success skills in physical activity and health. The class focuses on topics such as professional writing, academic literature, pedagogy, technical knowledge, and national certification exams.Fitness tests are also conducted for each student.
The purpose of this course is to increase students’ understanding of the complex nature of human behavior; to provide students with information and experiences that will enhance listening and communication skills; and to provide students with basic strategies for facilitating changes in behavior that are conducive to health while recognizing professional limitations and the need for coordination with other health care professionals. Students must have at least sophomore standing to register for this course.
This course investigates the development of physical activity and health curriculums and programs in school and non-school settings. This course will emphasize measurement and evaluation of individuals as it relates to physical activity, physical education and health. Student must have at least sophomore standing to register for this course.
Students will select a topic for their capstone experience.Students will research and prepare to undertake their capstone project under the guidance of the course instructor. Prerequisite: At least 120 credits completed,consent of instructor.
Students will complete their capstone under their capstone advisor. The result will be a project that demonstrates student’s competency in field of study. May be taken multiple terms. Prerequisite: HHP 495, consent of instructor.

Physical Education and Sport concentration (Required courses)

Study of psychological factors affecting sport performance and exercise participation. Specific attention will be given to techniques for effectively coaching athletes and teaching physical education classes. Topics include motivation, arousal, psychological skill training, goal setting, and group dynamics. Student must have at least sophomore standing to register for this course.
Study of the musculoskeletal structure of the living human body; bones and their specific articulations; segments and their movements; muscles and their attachments and actions. Special emphasis is placed on musculoskeletal analysis of basic exercise and movement patterns. Prerequisite: BIOL 231, 232, and 233, or consent of instructor. Student must have at least junior standing to register for this course.
Integration of skeletal and neuromuscular anatomy with mechanical principles of human motion. Analysis of sports skills for performance improvement. Prerequisite: EXS 321 or consent of instructor. Student must have at least junior standing to register for this course.
Investigation of the relationship between physical activity and physiological processes, with special emphasis on energy metabolism, neuromuscular structures and functions, cardiorespiratory responses to exercise, environmental stress and exercise and training principles. Prerequisite: BIOL 231, BIOL 232, or consent of instructor. Student must have at least sophomore standing to register for this course.
In this course, students will apply anatomical and biomechanical principles to the assessment of human movement. Students will acquire observational and evaluation skills necessary to provide assessment and intervention to improve movement performance. Practical experience under a variety of scenarios will be required as part of the course. Prerequisite: EXS 321 and 322.
A study, critique, and analysis of human motor growth and development and skill acquisition in regular populations. Topics include performance assessment and remediation, and adaptation of activities for individuals throughout the lifespan of development, with an emphasis on early childhood and older adults. Prerequisite: PSY 311 recommended. Student must have at least junior standing to register for this course.
Investigations of the historical aspects of providing adapted/ special physical education programs for special populations including implications of Federal Legislation; practice in the development and implementation of Individual Education Programs (I.E.P.) including assessment, program planning and evaluation; and practicum experience. Prerequisite: EXS 440 or consent of instructor. Student must have at least junior standing toregister for this course.
Study of the neurological basis for movement. Course content will include central and peripheral neurologic control, reflexes, motor theory, and the relationship between control of movement and acquisition of motor skills. Both theoretical and hands on approaches to motor control and learning will be utilized. Prerequisite: EXS 323 or consent of instructor. Student must have at least junior standing to register for this course
Consideration of the historical, philosophical, and ethical foundations of physical education and health. Exploration of contemporary values, issues, and controversies concerning sport and wellness.
Study and application of pedagogy for team sports. Fundamental skills, appreciation, knowledge of rules, and instructional strategy are emphasized for soccer, track & field, baseball/softball, football, rugby, volleyball, and basketball. Prerequisite: EXS 213.
Study and practice in taping, treatment of strains, sprains, contusions, and change wounds. Study of the importance of conditioning of the athlete. Prerequisite: EXS 321. Student must have at least sophomore standing to register for this course.
Study and application of pedagogy for games, dance and gymnastics. Fundamental skills, appreciation, knowledge of rules, and instructional strategy are emphasized for cricket, netball, speedball, team handball, and many games appropriate for elementary school. Topics also include self-defense, gymnastics, group exercise, and dance. Prerequisite: PES 294. Student must have at least sophomore standing to register for this course.
Principles and procedures in development, organization, administration and supervision of physical education, health and athletic programs. Emphasis on facilities use and construction, program supervision and legal liability. Students must have at least senior standing.
Study and application of pedagogy for individual sports. Fundamental skills, appreciation, knowledge of rules, and instructional strategy are emphasized for badminton, skiing, swimming, rock climbing, mountaineering, backpacking, orienteering, bicycling, tennis, archery, golf and bowling. Prerequisite: PES 394. Student must have at least junior standing to register for this course.

Physical Education and Sport Concentration – Choose One

First aid for emergency treatment of injuries with emphasis on the use of this knowledge as applied in everyday life and school situations. Certification cards are issued to those who qualify.
Course provides a general understanding of Exercise Physiology, Sport Pedagogy, Sport Psychology, and Sport Medicine for individuals who wish to coach in school or youth sport settings. The course is designed to provide certification through the American Sport Education Program. Student must have at least sophomore standing to register for this course.

Exercise Science concentration (Required Courses)

Study of the musculoskeletal structure of the living human body; bones and their specific articulations; segments and their movements; muscles and their attachments and actions. Special emphasis is placed on musculoskeletal analysis of basic exercise and movement patterns. Prerequisite: BIOL 231, 232, and 233, or consent of instructor. Student must have at least junior standing to register for this course.
Integration of skeletal and neuromuscular anatomy with mechanical principles of human motion. Analysis of sports skills for performance improvement. Prerequisite: EXS 321 or consent of instructor. Student must have at least junior standing to register for this course.
Investigation of the relationship between physical activity and physiological processes, with special emphasis on energy metabolism, neuromuscular structures and functions, cardiorespiratory responses to exercise, environmental stress and exercise and training principles. Prerequisite: BIOL 231, BIOL 232, or consent of instructor. Student must have at least sophomore standing to register for this course.
Study of macro- and micronutrient dietary requirements for healthy living. Topics include diet design, nutrient digestion, absorption and metabolism, energetics, and weight control. Emphasis on sport performance for all topic areas. Five- day computer dietary analysis and planning are included. Prerequisite BIOL 231, BIOL 232 or HWS 225. Student must have at least sophomore standing to register for this course.
Application of scientific theory and findings to understand and analyze the role of physical activity in chronic disease prevention and treatment. The following diseases or conditions will be reviewed: coronary heart disease, high blood pressure, blood cholesterol, high lipids, stroke, cancer, diabetes, osteoporosis, arthritis and asthma. Prerequisite: EXS 323 or consent of the instructor. Student must have at least junior standing to register for this course.
Study of the neurological basis for movement. Course content will include central and peripheral neurologic control, reflexes, motor theory, and the relationship between control of movement and acquisition of motor skills. Both theoretical and hands on approaches to motor control and learning will be utilized. Prerequisite: EXS 323 or consent of instructor. Student must have at least junior standing to register for this course
Study of psychological factors affecting sport performance and exercise participation. Specific attention will be given to techniques for effectively coaching athletes and teaching physical education classes. Topics include motivation, arousal, psychological skill training, goal setting, and group dynamics. Student must have at least sophomore standing to register for this course.
This course provides the opportunity for the integration and application of physiological, anatomical, biomechanical principles to the design and implementation of a training regimen to enhance movement performance. All levels of physical performance will be addressed from activities of daily living to elite sport. Topics and application incorporate experiences necessary for preparation for national certification as an applied exercise physiologist (or similar).

Choose 1 Option: STAT 243 & STAT 244 OR STAT 327

Principles of experimental design and associated data analysis techniques such as regression, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, and non-parametric statistics; experience with statistical packages for computers; introduction to exploratory data analysis. Prerequisite: Student has met math requirement for graduation. This course requires students to apply basic principles of mathematics including algebra. Intermediate Algebra or equivalent recommended. Students who have concerns about their level of mathematics preparation should discuss this with their adviser or their instructor. Student must have at least sophomore standing to register for this course.
This is an introduction to concepts of linear correlation and regression analysis. Students will also work with statistical computing packages such as MINITAB. Prerequisites: STAT 243A or STAT 243 (prerequisite or co-requisite).
This is an introduction to concepts of statistical data analysis including experimental design, descriptive statistics, the normal distribution, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing. Students will also work with statistical computing packages such as MINITAB. Prerequisites: MATH 095 or MATH 098.

Choose One Course From the Following:

The course studies contemporary wellness issues that include consumer health, community health, prevention and control of disease, health careers, socio-political issues related to community health, and environmental health. Student must have at least sophomore standing to register for this course.
In this course we will be investigating physical activity, physiological processes, nutrition, and how these are affected by environmental conditions. The human body undergoes acute and long term physiologic changes in response to changes in environmental conditions. These can include exposure to heat, cold, altitude, and other physical demands required for outdoor recreation and expeditions. These physiological changes lend insight in the processes critical for the maintenance of homeostasis andadaptation.

Community Health Concentration (Required Courses)

The course explores current personal health issues. Topics include family health, mental health, stress management, and human sexuality. Special emphasis is placed on preventative practices.
A study of the biological functions and dietary sources of the essential nutrients is provided. The relationship between nutrition and health is emphasized. Healthy nutrition principles are investigated by evaluating the diets of self and others.
An overview of the major components of wellness. Special emphasis is placed on needs and interests of college students approached from a social, emotional, physiological, and preventative basis that include diet, exercise, stress management, and substance abuse.
Today’s world has shrunk due to the ability of individuals to travel rapidly from place to place. This has created a world where health issues are no longer confined to a limited region, but can potentially affect the entire planet. This course will examine global health issues, including historic impacts of advancing civilization on health, HIV/AIDS and the distribution of antiretroviral (ARVs), Pandemic Flu and other infectious diseases such as malaria and tuberculosis, health care, chronic illness, and other issues. Student must have at least sophomore standing to register for this course.
The course studies contemporary wellness issues that include consumer health, community health, prevention and control of disease, health careers, socio-political issues related to community health, and environmental health. Student must have at least sophomore standing to register for this course.
This course is designed to explore the impact of diversity, power, and cultural differences that effect health issues within our population. Student must have at least sophomore standing to register for this course.
This course studies a range of legal and ethical issues related to Health Education and Health Promotion. This course will cover popular frameworks used within studying legal and ethical problems within public health. Additionally, students will review real life examples and apply class material to their current situations and future careers. Students will examine legal and ethical issues that may occur in their personal lives, in their community, within the United States, and across the globe.
The course will provide students with knowledge and skills pertinent to the development, implementation, and evaluation of successful health promotion programs in a variety of settings. Further, students will have the opportunity to apply that knowledge and their skills in a service learning situation. Student must have at least junior standing to register for this course.
This course will familiarize students to health promotion program evaluation, including needs assessment, formative research, process evaluation, monitoring of objectives and outputs, impact assessment, and cost analysis. Students will develop basic skills in a variety of approaches to evaluation, including techniques that are particularly suitable for evaluating health promotion, and community health improvement. Course learning will be synthesized through designing an evaluation framework and methodology for a relevant program. Students gain practical experience through a series of exercises involving the design of a conceptual framework, development of indicators, statistical analysis, and the development of an evaluation plan to measure impact.
Application of scientific theory and findings to understand and analyze the role of physical activity in chronic disease prevention and treatment. The following diseases or conditions will be reviewed: coronary heart disease, high blood pressure, blood cholesterol, high lipids, stroke, cancer, diabetes, osteoporosis, arthritis and asthma. Prerequisite: EXS 323 or consent of the instructor. Student must have at least junior standing to register for this course.

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