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B.S./B.A. in Anthropology and Sociology: Curriculum

Curriculum Details

180 total credits required

The online Bachelor’s in Anthropology and Sociology program is rooted in inquiry, research and critical thinking. This four-year program provides a background in general anthropology and sociology, while also exploring theory and practice.

With concentrations in anthropology as well as sociology and social welfare, you can prepare for a career or pursue graduate study in related fields. Earn your B.A. with a foreign language requirement or your B.S. with just 12 more science credits.

Transfer Information

EOU offers a generous transfer policy for course credits to make it even more affordable and accessible to learn. The online Bachelor’s in Anthropology and Sociology program allows up to 135 credits from previous college coursework to be transferred into EOU. All EOU majors require a minimum of 20 EOU credits.

Anthropology – Required Courses

The study of past cultures and societies through their material remains. We will explore different varieties of archaeology and examine theory, methods and techniques for investigation, reconstructing, interpreting, preserving, and learning from the past.

This course examines human beings as part of the animal kingdom, exploring topics like the principles and processes of evolution, genetics, living and fossil primates, the human fossil record and evolutionary history, early cultural development, and modern human diversity, including the concept of “race”. This course replaces ANTH 220. Students may not receive credit for both, but they may replace an earlier grade with a better grade in ANTH 202.

Cross-cultural overview of human society and organization. Concept of culture, language and society, subsistence strategies, cultural ecology, kinship, religion and worldview.

Introduction to anthropological linguistics: cross-cultural approaches to descriptive and comparative linguistics; primate communication and ape language studies; children’s acquisition of language; ethno-linguistics; and language and the socio-cultural construction of reality. ANTH 203 recommended. Student must have at least sophomore standing to register for this course.

Senior level seminar examining the development of anthropological ideas and concepts. Includes key theories and individuals in the past, as well as important contemporary themes and issues in cultural anthropology, and the other subdisciplines. Prerequisites: ANTH 201, ANTH 202, ANTH 203 and ANTH 356. Student must have at least junior standing to register for this course.

Opportunity for students completing the major to demonstrate understanding of the two fields through focused projects and other culminating activities. Student must have at least senior standing to register for this course.

This course is designed for anthropology students working on their research related to their capstone project. Individual subjects will vary depending on the research being conducted. Must have at least junior standing to register for this course.

This course is designed for anthropology students writing their capstone paper. Individual subjects will vary depending on the research being conducted. Student must have at least junior standing to register for this course.

An introduction to the sociological perspective on human behavior with emphasis on social location (history, culture, and social stratification), socialization, power and social interaction, inequality in social groups and understanding social change. Prerequisite: None, but college level reading and writing ability is expected.

The focus is on providing a sociological and critical thinking framework, allowing students to broaden their understanding of social problems, their causes and consequences, public perceptions and possible approaches to their resolution. Prerequisite: None, but college level reading and writing ability is expected.

Choose One Course From the Following:

The focus of this class is to develop well-rounded ethnographic researchers. This will be accomplished through an analysis of ethnographic research methods, participation observation, visual ethnography, questionnaire development, and research analysis. In addition, students will have the opportunity to work on their own ethnographic project. Prerequisites: ANTH 203, ANTH 356, and junior status.

This course focuses on the processes involved with making sense out of bits of scrap, rust, bone, and other materials collected from archaeological sites. Analyzing and collecting data from artifacts and features recovered during excavations is a core step for archaeologists in learning about human behavior in the past. This course explores techniques such as lithic analysis, faunal analysis,botanical/pollen analysis, stable-isotope analysis, spatial analysis, and other types of research methods used by archaeologists to study human history through material culture. Prerequisites: ANTH 201, ANTH 202, ANTH 203, and junior status.

Sociology – Required Courses

An introduction to the sociological perspective on human behavior with emphasis on social location (history, culture, and social stratification), socialization, power and social interaction, inequality in social groups and understanding social change. Prerequisite: None, but college level reading and writing ability is expected.

The focus is on providing a sociological and critical thinking framework, allowing students to broaden their understanding of social problems, their causes and consequences, public perceptions and possible approaches to their resolution. Prerequisite: None, but college level reading and writing ability is expected.

Analysis of the concept of social welfare including an introduction to the nature of government and voluntary programs and the services provided by them, as well as their theory, principles, and methods. Must have at least sophomore standing to register for this course.

Survey of basic social research strategies with emphasis on collection and analysis of data, including its effective presentation. Prerequisites: SOC 204 & 205. Student must have at least junior standing to register for this course.

Pre-professional placement with a social welfare/public services
provider, or project-based research addressing identified community/regional needs. This course requires developing a relationship with a community group or agency, and establishing placement/project goals prior to beginning the course. The supervised experience offers an option to explore areas that parallel student’s career goals, or to design and conduct a research project based on collection of primary data or use of secondary data. Prerequisites: SOC 315, SOC 327, and SOC 420 or SOC 455. Student must have senior standing to register for this course. Course can be repeated once.

Origin and growth of ideas leading to the development of sociology as a discipline. Study of the principal frames of reference in contemporary sociological theory. Prerequisites: A minimum of 15 hours of sociology is recommended; SOC 204 and 205. Student must have at least junior standing to register for this course.

Opportunity for students completing the major to demonstrate understanding of the two fields through focused projects and other culminating activities. Student must have at least senior standing to register for this course.

Choose One Course From the Following:

This course provides an introduction to the holistic study of humanity that defines the field of anthropology. Topics include human variation & race, human prehistory & archaeology, the culture concept and globalization, the evolution of language and modern sociolinguistic efforts. This course includes presentation of the applied anthropological opportunities for EOU students both in La Grande and beyond.

Cross-cultural overview of human society and organization. Concept of culture, language and society, subsistence strategies, cultural ecology, kinship, religion and worldview.

Choose One Course From the Following:

In-depth examination of concepts and issues related to the social welfare profession. Focused on practical skills and applications. Prerequisites: SOC 204, 205, 315, and upper division standing. Student must have at least junior standing to register for this course.

In consultation with agencies or community groups, students will design a community-based individual or team research project based on collection of primary data or the use of secondary data that addresses experiences, needs, or social change within the region. Serves as project design for senior capstone SOC 403. Prerequisites: SOC 315 and SOC 327. Student must have at least junior standing to register for this course.

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